"A Night's Delight & A Breakfast to Remember"Reservations

Turner Ashby Room

“A touch of class”

ashby-02
ashby-01
ashby-03

In this room…

Check Queen & twin bed
Check Private bathroom with shower (located across the hall)
Check Desk and chair
Check Central air and ceiling fan
Check Cable TV
Check Free WiFi

The Turner Ashby Room

This room with two beds is located on the second floor at the top of the steps. It features a wonderful view of the side yard. With laid-back decor and a peaceful atmosphere, this room makes a lovely place to stop and stay while in Harrisonburg, VA.

Availability

Turner Ashby Room Availability Calender

Rates

$149 per night for double occupancy*
*Maximum occupancy: 4, with a futon ($50/night for 3+; futon fee $20)
*When two guests use both beds, there is a $15 linen surcharge.

Be sure to check out our packages and add-ons!

Please note: Some of our dates are considered “Premium Weekends” and have special rates and stay requirements. For those dates, this room is sold based on an occupancy of three people. See the Premium Weekend Guidelines for details.



BOOK THIS ROOM

On a mobile device? The easiest way to make a reservation is by calling us at (540) 433-8233.


Who was Turner Ashby?

Turner Ashby, Junior was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War. He achieved prominence as Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s cavalry commander in the Shenandoah Valley and might have been one of the most famous cavalry commanders of the war had he not been killed in battle in 1862.

As Jackson’s army withdrew from the pressure of John C. Frémont’s superior forces, moving from Harrisonburg toward Port Republic, Ashby commanded the rear guard. On June 6, 1862, near Harrisonburg, the 1st New Jersey Cavalry attacked Ashby’s position at Good’s Farm. Although Ashby defeated the cavalry attack, a subsequent infantry engagement resulted in Ashby being shot through the heart, killing him instantly. (The origin of the fatal shot has been lost to history. Soldiers of the 13th Pennsylvania Reserve Infantry claimed credit, but some accounts blame friendly fire.)

Share this:

Pinterest